Are Ovarian Cysts Normal (And What Can I Do About Them)?

Ovarian cysts are extremely common, but they can make life difficult when they grow too large or rupture. Many women experience ovarian cysts, but only a small number of them will require treatment or surgery. 

When ovarian cysts begin causing problems, it's important to seek professional help. Dr. Daniel Kushner offers gynecological diagnosis and treatment for ovarian cysts and other reproductive health problems at his practice in White Plains, New York.

How ovarian cysts form

Ovaries are found on either side of the uterus and are responsible for producing and maturing eggs. They're also responsible for hormone development. Occasionally, sacs will form on or inside the ovary. When they get too large or begin to rupture, this can cause pain and other symptoms. There are two types of cysts: follicle and corpus luteum. 

Follicle cysts

Follicles are small sacs that form during every ovulation cycle. These sacs contain mature eggs, and the follicle breaks open to release them. A cyst occurs when the follicle fails to release its egg. These typically go away on their own in one to three months. 

Corpus luteum cysts

Corpus luteum cysts form when the follicle releases its egg, but the sac does not shrink down to its normal size. Instead, it re-seals and begins filling with fluid. These cysts can grow up to four inches wide and can cause a number of painful symptoms. 

Symptoms of Ovarian Cysts 

Most ovarian cysts do not have noticeable symptoms and go away on their own without pain. If unpleasant symptoms do occur, it's a sign that the cyst has grown too large and might need treatment. Symptoms include: 

Sometimes, cysts can rupture or twist the ovary. This requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms of a ruptured cyst or twisted ovary include: 

Getting Treatment for Ovarian Cysts

Treatment for ovarian cysts depends on the severity and cause of the cyst. Ultrasounds and pelvic examinations can help detect cysts and determine their mass and location. From there, your doctor can test for ovarian cancer, pregnancy, infection, and hormone imbalances. 

If you suffer from endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome, this might be the root of your problem. Surgeries can be required for large, unusual, cancerous, or post-menopausal cysts. You might be given pain medication or hormonal birth control to help regulate frequent cysts. 

A trained gynecologist can help identify and treat cysts, along with any conditions affecting their growth. Conditions like endometriosis or polycystic ovary syndrome can require long-term attention, but Dr. Kushner can help with the diagnosis and treatment. 

If you think you might be suffering from a persistent cyst, call our office at 704-769-2684, or use the online scheduling tool to book an appointment. 

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